NameWilliam H. “Boce” Hathcock
Birth6 May 1842, Haywood Co TN
Death26 Mar 1904, Ripley, Haywood Co TN Age: 61
BurialTrinity Cemetery, Nutbush, Haywood Co TN
FatherPeyton Hathcock (ca1802->1870)
MotherAnn Newman (ca1812-~1850)
Spouses
Birth1850
Death1914, Trinity Cemetery, Nutbush, Haywood Co TN Age: 64
Marriage3 Sep 1867, Haywood Co TN96
ChildrenRobert Franklin (1869-1940)
 Ansolm “Porter” (1871-1962)
 John A. (1876-)
 Richard N. “Dick” (1883-1918)
Notes for William H. “Boce” Hathcock
WILLIAM H. "BOCE" HATHCOCK96

William H. Hathcock was the third child of Peyton and Ann Newman Hathcock. He was born 6 May 1842 in Haywood county, Tennessee.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Haywood Blues at the age of 19. I do not have a copy of his war record. After the war he returned to Haywood County and on 3 September 1867 he married Frances Rosa McKinnon. They had four children, Robert Franklin Hathcock, Ansolm 'Porter Hathcock, John A. Hathcock and Richard N. "Dick” Hathcock.

William H. Hathcock died 26 March 1904 and is buried at the Trinity Cemetery, Nutbush, Haywood County, Tennessee. The Brownsville newspaper, States-Graphic, carried his obituary in the edition for 1 April 1904:

"Death of W. H. Heathcock. A Well Known Citizen of the Nut Bush Neighborhood. W. H. Heathcock dropped dead on the streets of Ripley Saturday at 1 o'clock p.m. He was standing near the south gate of the court house talking to some friends when he was stricken with heart failure and died before he could be carried to the office of Dr. A. H. Young, where he might receive medical aid. He died as quickly as though a bolt of lightning had struck him. His remains were removed to his home on the old Anderson farm near Woodville and buried Sunday evening. The deceased had many friends in Brownsville and it is a matter of much regret that owing to peculiar circumstances, none of his old comrades from this place could attend the funeral services. He was a gallant Confederate soldier, and was a member of the Sixth Tennessee regiment. When the war broke out between the states he joined the Haywood Blues under the leadership of Col. George C. Porter. This regiment was subsequently consolidated with the Ninth Tennessee. He settled in Haywood County after the war, and has since been a valued citizen, highly respected by a large host of friends. He frequently visited Ripley, it being nearer than Brownsville, his county seat, and was a member of John Sutherland Camp No. 890, U.C.V. at the former place. He leaves a wife and four children.”
Last Modified 4 Oct 2009Created 4 Mar 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh