Heathcock Genealogy Database - Person Sheet
Heathcock Genealogy Database - Person Sheet
NameSimon Hadley Ii
Birthca 1675, Ballinakill, Kings, or, W Meath, Ireland
Death17 Nov 1756, Mill Creek, New Castle Co DE Age: 81
BurialNew Garden MM, Chester Co PA
FatherSimon Hadley (1640-1711)
MotherCatherine Talbott (ca1640-1710)
Spouses
BirthFeb 1677, Kilcleagh, West Meath Co Ireland
Death18 Dec 1750, New Castle Co DE Age: 73
BurialNew Garden MM, Chester Co PA
Marriage1697, Moate MM, Kilcleagh, County West Meath, Ireland
ChildrenJoseph (1698->1755)
 Deborah (1701-)
 Joshua (1703-1760)
 Simon (1705-1730)
 Hannah (1709-1783)
 Ruth (1712-1785)
 Katherine (1715-)
 Anne (1717-)
Birthca 1684, New Castle Co DE
Death4 May 1769, West Bradford, Chester Co PA Age: 85
Marriage22 Sep 1752, New Garden MM, Chester Co PA
Notes for Simon Hadley Ii
SIMON HADLEY, son of SIMON and CATHERINE (TALBOT) HADLEY was born in Ireland in 1675, near the Kings County boundary line where his English ancestors had settled. He was a member of the Moate Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends.897

Simon Hadley came to America about 1712 from County West Meath, Ireland.898,899 He was accompanied to Pennsylvania by his wife Ruth, and six children. Two children were later born in Pennsylvania. It is unknown which ship he came over on. Many of the Friends sailed from Ireland to Pennsylvania on the ship Sizargh of Whitehaven. Jermiah Cowman was the master. However, Simon and his family do not appear on the records.

Simon did not present his certificate of removal until four years later. At Newark Monthly Meeting (now Kennett) held at Center Meeting House, Centerville, Delaware - "4th. of 6th. Mon. 1716, Simon Hadley produced a certificate from Moate Monthly Meeting in County of West Meath and Nation of Ireland which was read and accepted

Simon purchased 1000 acres of land about 30 miles south of Philadelphia in the Manor of Steyning. When the Pennsylvania Delaware line was drawn it passed through Simon's property, leaving part of his plantation in Chester County, Pennsylvania, but placing his home and official residence, and most of his plantation in New Castle County, Delaware. This became part of New Garden Township. The house is located on Lime Stone Road, Hackessin, DE about 10 miles northwest of Wilmington (or Wellington), DE, off Route 41. Go to Kaolin (about 3 miles before you get to Avondale) and turn left. Go down Route 7 for about 2 or 3 miles, turn right and go up a hill and there you are. The cornerstone is hidden under a tree. Among the neighbors of Simon Hadley are some familiar names: Lindley, Starr, Hutton, Rutledge, Miller, John, Gayan,-Rowland, and Johnson. All of these families were of English origin, as were all of the Friends who went to Pennsylvania from Ireland with the exception of two it is said. Many of them had been friends in Ireland and others were related by blood or marriage. [A perche equals 5.5 yards]

The description that Chalmers Hadley gives to the house which was called Messuage Plantation of Steyning Manor, is as follows: The oldhouse is on a slight eminence nearly a quarter of a mile back from the road, and the nearest railroad station, Southwood, is on what probably was once part of the place. The old house is a two and one-half story, stucco-covered stone structure, and the gabled roof permits the use of rooms on the third floor. The pointed windows under the gables give aquaint appearance to the old building, and along the front extends a long porch. Underneath the pointed gable window in the front a white stone slab is sunk in the wall and on it is carved "S. and R. H. 1717," the initials of Simon and his wife, Ruth Hadley, and the date of the building's erection. Some distance from the house is an old stone barn which appears to be as ancient as the house itself.

This house is still in use and in 1977 the owner's wife was a Dupont-Pierre's favorite niece. In 1716, Newark Monthly Meeting was divided and New Garden Monthly Meeting created. It was composed of the meetings of New Garden, Nottingham and London Grove. By deed dated 26th. of 10th. Mo. 1717 James Miller conveyed six acres of land to Simon Hadley as trustee for New Garden Meeting. Simon apparently was quite active in this meeting. His name frequently appears on committees and he was made an overseer 28 May 1733. He and his wife, Ruth, are buried there. On at least one occasion, we find Simon taking active part in his Quarterly Meeting also. His name appears on a petition from Concord Quarterly Meeting dated 3rd. Mo. 13th. 1734 and addressed to King George II ofEngland, regarding the boundary disputes between the Penns and Lord Baltimore.

Although such activities were usually frowned upon by Friends, Simon was not completely inactive in public affairs. He was appointed Justice of the Peace by Governor Fletcher 25 July 1726, re-appointed 20 April 1727, and again 1 Dec 1733. He also served at various times as Judge of the New Castle Court.

Simon Hadley helped his sons secure land of their own. In 1726, we find that Joseph Hadley already had a tract of land near his father's plantation. In that year, Simon Hadley made over another tract of land to his son, Joshua Hadley.

(Early Pennsylvania Land Records - Egle, 1976 pg 759)

Minute Book I 28th 12mo. 1728

"Joshua Hadley requests (by his Father, Simon Hadley) the grant of a quantity of land on Fishing Creek, he desires 1,000 acres."

Attached to Simon's first will, written in 1751, following the death of his wife Ruth, was this note. "It is my will that my executors dispose of my servant lad Joseph Fitzpatrick's time for the benefit of my said children as above, written before the said will was perfected by me."

Tradition says that Simon was killed in his stable by a servant who wanted to rob him of the considerable amount of money he carried with him. No record has ever been found to substantiate this. However, in a letter written by Simon's Daughter, Hannah, (Hadley) Stanfield, from North Carolina to her step-mother, we can see that her father died suddenly in 1756:

"Respected Mother -

This comes to let Thee know that I and my family is in good health at present, hoping that these few lines will find thee and thine in thesame, and I have great cause to be thankful to the Divine Being for it.

I received thy letter dated the 31st of 5th month 1756, and was glad to hear of thy welfare and a true account of my respected father's sudden death.

Thy brother Richard Beson was here at my house a few days ago. He told me that his wife and family was well and all of our friends here is reasonably well as far as I know, so not having much to add, I shall conclude with my love to thee and thine and remain thy loving daughter, ye 24th of ye 7th month, 1756.
Hannah Stanfield"

Simon and Ruth were buried in the New Garden burying ground. Chalmers Hadley visited the old cemetery but found no identification of the graves. He noted that it seems in early times, Friends did not mark the resting place of their members with a stone of any kind. Chalmers described the old meeting house as follows: "New Garden meeting house is a venerable old structure built of red and black brick, brought from England, it is said. In front of the meeting house stood a mounting stone and a low stone wall surrounded both the meeting house and the burying ground adjoining it. There was an air of antiquity about the interior of the old building. The long room where Hadleys, Lindleys, Rowlands, and Greggs worshipped in past years, was divided by sliding shutters for the men's and women's meetings. A huge fireplace was in each end, but these had been closed and stoves were substituted, the pipes of which went through limestone slabs in the ceiling. Time-worn oak panelling, put together with wooden pegs, extended around the room, and the heavy wooden benches, black from age, were covered with initials of generations of youngsters until the carvings appeared as relief work. Back of the gallery where John Salkeld, Jacob Lindley and other zealous Friends had preached in long gone days, was a case of well-thumbed, leather-bound books on the doctrines of Friends. Outside in the shelter of a splendid Magnolia tree in a score of unmarked graves, sleep the ancestors of many families in North Carolina and Indiana."

(Information from The Hadley Family by Lyle H. Hadley and an article in the Pennsylvania Traveler Post, v. 16, #3, pg. 3 and "Hadleys of Hendricks Co. Indiana", Library of Congress No 62 10576, edited and published by Harlan V. Hadley, and from a book written in 1916 by Chalmers Hadley.)

Ruth Keran Hadley died on December 18, 1750. She was buried in theburial grounds of the New Garden Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania, belonging to the Chester County Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. This cemetery joins the old meeting house and both are only about 1 mile from SIMON HADLEY'S farm. SIMON HADLEY is buried next to RUTH (KERAN) HADLEY, but their graves are not marked.

SIMON HADLEY married PHOEBE GRUBB on July 22, 1752, at the New Garden Meeting. He had no children with her. She was a minister in the Society of Friends, and SIMON HADLEY made a settlement on her at the timeof their marriage.

SIMON HADLEY seems to have been very wealthy, and as his sons grew to manhood, he assisted them in securing land of their own. In 1726, JOSEPH HADLEY owned land near his father's farm, and that same year, SIMON HADLEY gave another tract of land to his second son, JOSHUA HADLEY.

SIMON HADLEY'S farm is where the British camped on the eve of the Battle of Brandywine during the Revolutionary War. In settling the new country, the HADLEYS seem to have been good judges of land, which was purchased in the rich bottoms, and always where springs abounded. The HADLEY'S were surrounded by forests and unsettled conditions, but they formed communities with other Quakers, and soon erected meeting and school houses. The HADLEY family seems to have had a high sense of honor, because there was an old saying in certain sections where they lived. It said that the name of HADLEY was worth one hundred and fifty dollars to its possessor. If a fence was found to have one rail more than was necessary, it meant that the fence enclosed HADLEY land.

ALL THE QUAKER HADLEYS, with revisions.
a unpublished compilation of works by Harlan Hadley, Lyle Hadley, and Wallace Hadley. Hadley Society Files.

Chapter 3

"ALL THE QUAKER HADLEYS. The Early Generations.
Simon HADLEY, farmer, justice of the Peace, county judge, immigrant, patriarch of all the Quaker Hadleys of Chester County, Pennsylvania and New Castle County, Delaware [lived Messuage Plantation, Steyning Manor]; born 1675 Ireland, son of Simon I and Catherine (TALBOT) HADLEY of Ballynakill (near Dublin), Ireland; died 1756 Messuage Plantation, buried New Garden Monthly Meeting, Pennsylvania; married (1) 1697 Ruth KERAN/KERN, born 1677 Ireland; died 18 Dec 1750 Messuage Plantation, buried New Garden MM; m (2) 22 Jul 1872 Phoebe (GRUBB) BUFFINGTON, a Quaker minister, daughter of John and Frances GRUBB.

"...Simon and Ruth and their first six children after landing at Philadelphia in 1712 had several temporary addresses, mostly in Chester County, before he chose their permanent home. In 1717 he built Messuage Plantation on 1000 acres in one of William Penn's townships, Steyning Manor, in Chester County. The Mason Dixon survey of 1763-69, undertaken to settle the William Penn Lord Baltimore dispute as to the southern boundaries of Pennsylvania, located Messuage Plantation just over the line
in Delaware, near Hockessin. Part of his farm continued to be in Pennsylvania, however, and apparently he was recognized as a citizen of both states.

Traditionally, Simon came to America with a substantial advance patrimony. Before he died at 81, he had been able to dower his daughters, to establish his sons on farms of their own and to help them acquire additional acreage. He also had done the same for several adult grandchildren. In addition, his will made bequests to all of them, including more than 50 grandchildren; with a total probative value in excess of $50,000. It identified him as a man of great wealth for that time and place.

Along with his wife, mother and father and his brothers and sisters, Simon at 31 in 1706 affiliated with the Society of Friends of Moate County Westmeath, Ireland, about 60 miles northwest of Dublin. Their home was at Ballynnakill, 60 miles southwest of Dublin, in County Leix. Simon's father, Simon I, also owned a fishery in Dublin and an iron foundry in Kings County, near Tullamore, or

Simon I is on the Moate meeting record with an apology for having allowed Simon II 'too many liberties'. Simon II apparently had great difficulty, because of repeated involvement in 'military activities', in keeping 'in unity' with the meeting. These incidents probably reflected his efforts to protect himself from, or to retaliate against, the brutal hazing (or worse) for which Quakers in Ireland (and England) were long considered fair game.

Simon II in 1716, on chosing his home site, transferred his Friends' family membership from Moate MM to Newark (now Kennett) MM, Pennsylvania. Newark divided later that year to create New Garden MM. He was active in the leadership and good graces of New Garden all the rest of his life. He served on New Garden committees, as a trustee and overseer, and is mentioned frequently in meeting minutes."
Notes for Simon Hadley Ii
1756 Will of Simon Hadley894

Simon Hadley's last will, written in 1755, was recorded in 1756. There were several changes made in this last will from the former one. These included some 600 acres of land not mentioned in the last will. It may have been that at his second marriage this land constituted the settlement bestowed on Phoebe Buffington by Simon Hadley, or this land may have been given in the meantime to his two sons, Joseph and Joshua, who were scantily remembered in the last will as compared to Simon Hadley's various grandchildren. Attached to the will was the deposition of David Finney, attorney at law, taken before William Till, Register of Wills for the probate, and granting letters of administration in and for the county of New Castle. In this deposition Finney said: "He was at the mansion house of Simon Hadley, Esq., on Jan. 21st, 1756, and that Simon Hadley seemed unable to determine what sum should be left Phoebe, his wife, and Finney suggested 200 pounds, to which Simon agreed was fair, in addition to the marriage settlement he had given her." The last will, which was written by Simon Hadley in 1755, was recorded in 1756 and was as follows:

"Know all men by these presents that I, Simon Hadly of Mill Creek Hundred in the County of New Castle on Delaware, yeoman, calling to mind the mortality of my body, do make and ordain this my last will and testament, and as touching such worldly estate where-with it has pleased God to bless me in this life, I do give, devise and dispose of the same. in the manner and form following:

First, it is my will that my funeral charge and just debts be first paid.

It is my will and I do leave my beloved wife, Phebe Hadly _________ pounds current money to be paid her six months after my death, to be paid by my executors, hereinafter mentioned, her chaise and chaise-horse, my riding mare and the two best cows I have, besides what I have left her in my marriage settlement with her, and as much of the furniture of the house as she will think fit to, take, to the value of pounds and no more, which shall be in full of my real and personal estate.

Imprimus, -- I give, devise and bequeath unto my grandson Simon Hadley, son of my son Joshua Hadley, the Messuage plantation and tract of land I now live on, bounded and described as follows Viz. Beginning at a corner post, being a corner of Jacob John's lands thence by his line east 300 perches to a corner white oak in the Manor line, thereon south by the said line 217 perches to a corner hickory, thence west by the land now seated by my grandson John Hadley, 73 perches to a post, thence north 31 degrees, west 38 perches to a black oak, thence north 50 degrees, west 48 perches and a half to a gum tree, thence north 60 degrees west 137 perches and a half to another gum, thence north 20 degrees, west 19 perches to a post, thence north 69 degrees, 59 perches to a post in William Rows line, thence north by the same 46 perches to the place of beginning, contain-260 acres be the same more or less, making the bounds aforesaid, with the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging, to hold to him, my said grandson Simon Hadley and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, but if my said grandson should depart this life without lawful issue, then it is my will and I do give and devise the same Messuage plantation and tract of land unto my grandson Jeremiah Hadley, son of my said son Joshua Hadley, to hold to him and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, but if he should depart this life without male heirs as above, then and in such case I give and devise and bequeath the said messuage plantation and tract of land and premises unto the next male heirs as consanguinity to him and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever. I also give and bequeath unto my said grandson Simon Hadley, my clock and walnut clothes press which stands in one of the upper rooms and the sum of ten pounds lawful money, all of which several bequests to be possessed by him when he shall arrive at the respective age of twenty-one years.

I give devise and bequeath unto my grandson, Simon Johnson, son of Robert Johnson, certain plantation and tract of land lying contiguous to the above land devised to my grandson Simon Hadley, bounded and described as followeth; Viz. Beginning at a corner mulberry tree being a corner of the land late of Joshua Hadley, but now of Robert Johnson, thence west by the same land one hundred and eighty perches to a post thence north by the said Rows land 134 perches to a corner post of the above land devised to my said grandson Simon Hadley, thence south 6g degrees, east by the said tract 59 perches to a post and south 20 degrees, east 19 perches to a gum tree and south 60 degrees, east 137 perches and a half to another gum and south 50 degrees, east 48 perches and a half to a corner black oak and south 31 degrees, east 38 perches to a corner post in a line of the land seated by my said grandson John Hadley, thence west by the same 57 perches to a corner black oak in a line of the aforesaid Robert Johnson land, thence north by the same 37 perches to the place of the beginning, containing by estimation 112 acres be the same more or less within the bounds aforesaid, with the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, to hold to him, my said grandson Simon Johnson, and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, but if he my said grandson, Simon Johnson should happen to depart this life without male heirs as above, then and in such cue I give, devise and bequeath the said tract of land and premises unto the next male heirs by consanguinity to him. my said grandson, and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, to be possessed by my said grandson when he shall arrive at the respective age of twenty-one years.

I do give and bequeath to my grandson, John Hadley, son of my son Joseph Hadley, and the male heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, a plantation or tract of land here-in-after mentioned, but if he should depart this life without male heirs, then in such case, it is my will and I do give and bequeath the said plantation and tract of land to' the next male heir by blood to him and his heirs forever, said plantation and tract of land to be bounded as followeth; Beginning at a corner black oak in the line of the said Robert Johnsons land, thence east 130 perches to a corner hickory tree in the said Manor line, thence by the said line south 185 perches to a corner oak sapling-(faded out)--containing within the said bounds 150 acres of land, be the same more or less, and I do bequeath to my said grandson John Hadley, ten pounds current money.

I do give and bequeath a plantation or tract of land to ____ ,Johnson in the Letitia Aubrey Manor containing 93 acres and 66 perches of land. I have a deed for the same and recorded in the name of my grandson Simon Gregg, son of Richard Gregg departed, and Anne his wife, my daughter, to him and the male hens of his body lawfully begotten as above, but should he depart this life, it is my will and I do give the said plantation and tract of land to the next male heirs by blood to him and the male heirs of his body legally begotten forever, and it is my will that my executors here-in-after named, rent the above plantations to good tenants until my said grandsons arrive at the age of twenty-one years, that all of my said grandsons shall pay the ____________ due on each of their plantations when lawfully--(faded out).

I do leave my said son, Joseph Hadley, half of my wearing apparel and ten pounds current money, which shall be his full portion and share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave my daughter, Deborah Howel, wife of Jacob Howel, ten pounds current money and I do leave to the said Jacob Howel, ten pounds current money, which shall be in full their portion and share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave to my daughter, Hannah Stanfield, widow of John Stanfield, fifty pounds current money which shall be paid in full of her portion and share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave to my daughter, Ruth Lindley, wife to Thomas Lindley, ten pounds current money, and I do leave to the said Thomas Lindley, ten pounds current money, which shall be their full share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave to my daughter Katherine Johnson, wife to Robert Johnson, the sum of ten pounds of current money, and I do leave to the said Robert Johnson, the sum of ten pounds current money, which shall be their full share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave to my daughter Anne Gregg, widow of Richard Gregg departed, the sum of forty pounds current money which shall be in full of her portion and share of my real and personal estate.

I do leave my son Joshua Hadley, ten pounds current money and half of my wearing apparel which shall be in full of his portion and share of my real and personal estate.
I do leave to my grand-daughter Elizabeth Thompson, wife to James Thompson, forty pounds current money and I do leave to my grand-daughter Deborah Curle, wife of John Curle the sum of five pounds of current money, and to my grand-daughter Hannah Curle, wife to Samuel Curle the sum of forty pounds current money, all of them children of my son Joseph Hadley.

I do leave to my grand-children Ruth Marshall, wife to John Marshall, the sum of twenty pounds current money. and I do leave to Thomas Hadley, the sum of forty pounds current money, and I do leave to Sarah Fred, wife to Joseph Fred, the sum of fifty pounds current money, and I do leave to Mary Hadley the sum of sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Jeremiah Hadley the sum of sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Joshua Hadley, Jr. the sum of sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Joseph Hadley Jr. the sum of sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Deborah Hadley sixty pounds current money and I do leave Hannah Hadley the sum of sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Catherine Hadley, the sum of sixty pounds current money, all of them children of my son Joshua Hadley.

I do leave to my grand-children to wit, I do leave to Simon Dixon fifty-five pounds current money, and I do leave Rebecca Marshall wife to William Marshall. thirty pounds current money and I do leave Ruth Dixon sixty pounds current money and I do leave to John Stanfield, Jr. the sum of fifty pounds current money, and I do leave Thomas Stanfield fifty pounds current money, and I do leave Samuel Stanfield fifty pounds current money, all of them children of my said daughter Hannah Stanfield, widow and relict of John Stanfield departed.

I do leave to my grandchildren, to Catherine Lindley, sixty pounds current money, and I do leave James Lindley sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Simon Lindley sixty pounds current money and I do leave Ruth Lindley, Jr. sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Mary Lindley, Jr. sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Elenor Lindley sixty pounds current money, and I do leave John Lindley sixty pounds current money and I do leave William Lindley sixty pounds current money and I do leave Thomas Lindley, Jr. sixty pounds current money, all children 'of' my daughter Ruth Lindley, wife to Thomas Lindley and I do leave Deborah Lindley sixty pounds current money.

I do leave to my grand children, Hannah Taylor, wife to Joseph Taylor, sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Caleb Johnson sixty pounds current money and I do leave to John Johnson sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Freeman Johnson sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Jonathan Johnson sixty pounds current money, and I do leave to Isaac Johnson sixty pounds current money, all children to my daughter Katherine Johnson, wife to Robert Johnson.

I do leave to my grand-children to-wit; Sarah Smith Gregg, fifty-five pounds current money, and I do leave to Jacob Gregg sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Ruth Gregg five pounds current money, and I do leave William Gregg sixty pounds current money, and I do leave Mirriam Gregg sixty pounds current money and I do leave Deborah Gregg sixty pounds current money and I do leave Phebe Gregg sixty pounds current meney, all of them children of my daughter Ann Gregg, widow and relict to Richard Gregg departed.

NOTE-John Lindley was twice set down in a mistake and when I found, the mistake I erased it with my own hand. Deborah Lindley was born in North Carolina and I did not remember her to get her name down in the proper place, but I do give the said sum set down on the other side.

And it is my will that as many of my said grand-children which are at age at my decease, that my executors shall pay them their legacies left them by me one year after my decease, and all my said grand-children which are not of age, I do order my said executors to give it into the hands of the parents of the said grand-children, they giving bond and security with interest for the same for the benefit of their children, and my said grand-children, to be paid one year after my decease to said parents, but if they refuse to comply as above, then I do order my said executors to put out the said legacy left by me to my said grand-children into good hands at interest, and pay them as above when they come of age with the interest of said legacy at twenty-one years or day of marriage which first shall happen.

It is my will that if any of my grand-children depart this life before they come to age or before, unmarried, that their legacy left them by me shall be equally divided among their survivors, and it is my will that if any of my granddaughters or grand-sons wives should have any more children before my decease or be pregnant, that then my said executors shall put to interest for them the sum of fifty pounds current money, and pay them as above said. I do leave to my nephew Thomas Kiernan, the sum of ten pounds current money.

I do leave to my said wife's children to wit; John Buffington, one pistole, [n.b., a pistole was a Spanish gold piece] Richard Buffington one pistole, Phebe Wall one pistole, Peter Buffington one pistole, Isaac Buffington one pistole, Joseph Buffington ten pounds current money to be paid them one year after my decease and what bonds, notes or accounts be payable to me from any of my grand children or their husbands, must be discounted out of the legacy left them by me, and I here-by constitute make and ordain my trusty and well-beloved Grand-son-inlaw, James Thompson and my trusted and well beloved grand-son John Hadley and my worthy and well loved friend, Daniel Nichols, all of them in Mill Creek Hundred in the County of New Castle on Delaware, yeomen, my executors of this my last will and testament, and I do hereby revoke and make void all former wills made by me at any time here-to-fore, and I do leave my executors thirty pounds current money to each of them, for their care and trouble they will have about the managing and settling of my said estate, which said sum shall be in full for their care and trouble and shall not have more for their commission, nor any other charge against my said estate on that account, but I do allow my said executors shalf' have commissions for what just money shall be received by them arising out of the legacies left by me to my said grand-children until they respectively arrive at the age above-said. and I do desire and request my trusty friends Benjamin Swett of the town of New Castle, Esq. and Samuel Gregg of Christiana Hundred and county above said, yeomen, to be overseers, to see that my last will and testament be well and truly performed, and for their care and trouble I do leave to each of them the sum of five pounds current money, to be paid by the said executors, and it is my will that what is left to my said son, Joseph Hadley, should be kept in my said executors hands and give it to him at several times as they see it is necessary for it.

In witness whereof I have here-unto set my hand and my seal this 3rd day of November, one thousand seven hundred and fifty five (1755).

Note before signing and sealing-It is my will that if any of my grand-ehildren should fall heir to any of the above said tracts of land by the death of him or them which I have willed it to, then it is my will that he or they which shall fall heir to said estate or estates, shall not have the said fifty pounds willed to them by me as above, but shall be equally divided as above to the surviving grand-children.

Signed, Sealed, pronounced and declared by the said Simon Hadley to be his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribers."

* * * * *

No inventory of Simon Hadley's estate was found with the will. In addition to his home and lands Simon Hadley divided about $15,000 in money among his family, a large estate for those days.

This old will, yellowed with age and held together with what appeared to be a hand-made pin, was found by the compiler of these notes in the court house in Wilmington, Delaware, in August, 1908. They had been moved with other court ' records from New Castle, Delaware, many years before.

Aside from a few faded words the will was easily deciphered and it was signed by Simon Hadley in a firm, round hand.

An abstract of the will has recently been printed in the "Calendar of Delaware Wills, New Castle County, 1682-1800," by the Colonial Dames of Delaware. This shows that the number of bequests in Simon Hadley's will were sixty-eight in number, which exceeds any other in the Calendar.

There are several interesting items in the will. It will be noticed that Simon Hadley did not use the "e" in his name, although he did in writing of his children. It shows that he must have already given his sons Joseph and Joshua their share in the estate, as in the will they are given but 10 pounds each ", and half of their father's wearing apparel. Even with such a scanty remembrance, it would seem that Simon Hadley was uncertain of his son Joseph to handle it properly and therefore specified the manner in which the bequest should be given him.

The nephew, Thomas Kiernan, mentioned in the will, was doubtless the son of Simon Hadley's sister, Jane Kiernan, mentioned in the letter of administration referred to by the Office of Arms, Dublin Castle.

Simon Hadley was buried with his wife Ruth in the New Garden burying ground. Several years ago a visit was paid to this old cemetery, but no identification of the graves was found as in early times, it seems, Friends did not mark the resting place of their members with a stone of any kind.

New Garden meeting house is a venerable old structure built of red and black brick, brought from England, it is said. In front of the meeting house stood a mounting stone and a low stone wall surrounded both the meeting house and the burying ground adjoining it. There was an air of antiquity about the interior of the old building. The long room where Hadleys, Lindleys, Rowlands and Greggs worshipped in past years, was divided by sliding shutters for the men's and women's meetings. A huge fireplace was in each end, but these had been closed and stoves were substituted, the pipes of which went through limestone slabs in the ceiling. Time-worn oak panelling, put together with wooden pegs, extended around the room, and the heavy wooden benches, black from age, were covered with initials of generations of youngsters until the carvings appeared as relief work. Back of the gallery where John Salkeld, Jacob Lindley and other zealous Friends had preached in long gone days, was a case of well-thumbed, leather-bound books on the doctrines of Friends. Outside in the shelter of a splendid magnolia tree in a score of unmarked graves, sleep the ancestors of many families in North Carolina and Indiana.

In Simon Hadley's will it will be noticed that at his death many of his descendants were already in the South. His son, Joshua Hadley, was in Virginia at that time and several grandchildren were living in North Carolina. The tide of emigration to the South was at its full just then and it continued until the Revolutionary War put a stop to travel.
Notes for Phoebe (Spouse 2)
Will of Phebe Grubb Buffington Hadley
1767900

Will of Phebe Buffington Hadley

"Be it remembered that I Phebe HADLEY of the Township of West Bradford in the County of Chester & Province of Pennsylvania, Widow, knowing the uncertainty of Life do make this my Last will & Testament in the following Manner..

Imprimus: My Will is that all my Just debts and funeral charges be first paid and discharged as soon as may be after my decease by my Exectr hereafter named...

Item - I give to the Heir of my Late Husband Simon Hadley the sum of Five Shillings

Item - I give unto my daughter Phebe WALL the wife of John WALL all my wearing apparrel [sic]

Item - I give unto my son Nathaniel all the Bonds and Debts which are now due to me or payable from him in Leiu of all other Bequests

Item - I give unto my son Peter BUFFINGTON and my son-in-law John WALL the several obligations and debts that they are now indebted to me respectively to each their respective debts in Lieu of all other bequests.

Item - I give thirty pounds to be equally divided between all my children now living and my son in law Samuel O___ [Osburn?] and my granddaughter Frances BUFFINGTON share and share alike it being for building a house on my land

And all the remainder part of my estate both real and personal not heretofore bequeathed I give to my sons John BUFFINGTON his heirs and assigns forever, he or they providing for me a good and sufficient maintainence during my natrual life and decently burying me when I am dead.

Lastly I do hereby constitute nominate and appoing my son John BUFFINGTON to be sole executor of this my last will and Testament and I do hereby utterly revoke and disannul all other and former wills by me heretofore made ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

In witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this second day of the ninth month anno domini 1767.

Signed sealed published and declared by the testator { [signed] as her last will and testament in the presents of us | Phebe HADLEY Richard BUFFINGTON, Robert BUFFINGTON } [illegible, with a date] John SNOW"
Last Modified 2 Jul 2010Created 27 Dec 2020 using Reunion for Macintosh
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