Heathcock Genealogy Database - Person Sheet
Heathcock Genealogy Database - Person Sheet
NameAndrew Jackson Adair , GG Grandfather
Birth13 May 1831, Locust Grove, Henry Co GA
Death18 Jul 1911, Buda, Hays Co TX Age: 80
BurialKyle Cemetery
Birth13 May 1831, Locust Grove, Henry Co Georgia
Death18 Jul 1911, Buda, Hays, Texas Age: 80
FatherJames Adair (1790-1851)
MotherAnn Smith (1789-1852)
Spouses
1Frances Ann Gannt 325,326, GG Grandmother
Birth28 Oct 1839, Gibson Co TN
Death7 Nov 1882, Tyro, Tate Co MS Age: 43
BurialTyro Cemetery327
FatherWilliam Gant (1786-1851)
MotherElizabeth Thomas (1799-1842)
Marriage1 Oct 1857, Marshall Co MS328,275
ChildrenLaura Adeline (1858-1948)
 Edward Lee “Edd” (1868-1947)
 Margaret Pearl (1871-1951)
 Mary Coral (1874-1950)
 Arthur Iverson (1877-1892)
 Lula Judson (1882-1959)
Notes for Andrew Jackson Adair
Andrew Jackson Adair was born May 13, 1831 while his parents were living in Henry County Georgia. He moved with his parents and brother John Adair to Shelby County Tennessee and is listed as living with them in the 1850 census. On October 1, 1857, in Marshall County Mississippi, Andrew Jackson Adair married Frances A. Gant, born October 28, 1839. Marshall County is in the Northwest corner of Mississippi, and abuts Shelby County Tennessee, which is in the Southeast corner of that state. Marshall County was created from Indian lands that were gained in the Chickasaw Cession of 1832.

On March 22, 1862, Andrew Jackson Adair enlisted in Company I of the 34th Regimental Mississippi Infantry at Tyro, Mississippi. On June 27, 1862, Private Adair was sent to a hospital in Columbus, Mississippi. His muster roll for November and December, 1862 notes that he was "still in the hospital" at Chattanooga, Tennessee. In April, 1863 his enlistment was commuted and on August 2, 1863 he was transferred to Company G of the 3rd Confederate Engineer Troops, as an Artificer. He remained in the Engineer Corps until the end of the war, and was mustered out after the surrender of Joseph E. Johnston to W. T. Sherman at Catawaba Bridge, South Carolina on May 5, 1865. While in the Engineer Corps, Andrew Jackson Adair participated in building and destroying several bridges and also helped with the construction of batteries atop Lookout Mountain, overlooking Chattanooga. On the morning of November 24, 1863, his division was "driven from our batteries while at work by the enemy sharpshooters." The "enemy" were the Northern forces under the command of General Joseph Hooker, and the storming of Lookout Mountain was but one event in the lifting of the Confederate siege of Chattanooga. The Northern victory at Lookout Mountain on November 24 and the succeeding victory at Missionary Ridge the next day threw the Confederates into retreat and resulted in Ulysses S. Grant being named commander of all of the Union forces.

In 1873 Marshall County Mississippi was subdivided, and Tate County was created. The 1875 tax roll of Tate County shows that A. J. Adair owned two mules and two carriages. The 1880 Federal census shows that both Andrew Jackson Adair, and his brother John S. Adair were residents of Tate County. This census also lists Charles Morton Harris, aged 18, as a tenant in the home of George Stanton.

1880 Centus of Thyratira and Tyro, Tate Co MS

Name Age
A. J. Adair 50 GA SC SC
Francis A. Adair 40 TN
C. P. Adair 18 MS
J. W. Adair 14 MS
E. L. Adair 12 MS
M. P. Adair 8 MS
M. C. Adair 5 MS
A. I. Adair 3 MS


Frances Gant Adair died in Tyro, Tate County Mississippi on November 7, 1882. In December of 1886 The Adairs and several of their children and their families left Mississippi and migrated west to Texas, settling in Hays County. Andrew Jackson Adair lived the rest of his life in Hays County and died in Buda on July 18, 1911. He is buried in the Kyle Cemetery in Hays County.
Notes for Andrew Jackson Adair
Newspaper clipping found in the belongings of Mabel Coral Harris Lay.

Mr. A. J. Adair

Died at the home of his son, J. W. Adair, near Goforth on Tuesday morning, July 18, at 7 o'clock, after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Adair was born May 13, 1831, in Henry County, Georgia, went to Mississippi when a boy, where he lived until December, 1886, since which time he has been in Hays County, Texas. He leaves seven children, J. W. and E. L. Adair, of Goforth, Mrs. W. T. Hargis, of Oxford, Miss, Mrs. C. M. Harris of Georgetown, Mrs. Robt Stewart of Dilley, Mrs. J. L. Franks of Beeville, Mrs. B. H. Rylander of Buda and a number of grandchildren, and a host of friends. Mr. Adair has been a member of the Baptist church nearly 60 years, and the contented life of this devout man of God had been a benediction to those whose privilege it was to come under its influence. And long afte rthe body has mouldered to dues, his influence for good will be known and felt in the community where he lived.

He was in the Confederate army during the entire war.

Interment at Kyle Cemetery Wednesday morning. Services at the grave conducted by Rev. York of San Marcos, assisted by Revs Boyd of Kyle and Brag.
Notes for Andrew Jackson Adair
Confederate Service Record
Private Andrew Jackson Adair
Company I, 34 Regimental Mississippi Infantry

Reference: Mississippi Confederate Service Records, Roll 356 [examined at the National Archives, Washington, DC, 4 March 1983].

1. 22 Mar 1862: enlisted at Tyro, Mississippi, for 3 years.
2. 27 Jun 1862: sent to hospital at Columbus, Mississippi, by Surgeon Murry.
3. Nov-Dec 1862: sick in hospital at Chattanooga, Tennessee.
4. Jan-Feb 1863: still in hospital.
5. Mar-Apr 1863: "commutation due from enlistment; has been in hospital for 8 months."
6. Jul-Aug 1863: "transferred to Engineer Corps, Special Order from Army Headquarters, 2 Aug 1863.

Confederate Service Record
Andrew Jackson Adair, Artificer
Company G, 3 Regimental Engineer Corps

1. 22 Mar 1862: enlisted at Tyro, Mississippi, by J. Fort.
2. Aug-Oct 1863: muster roll.
3. Nov-Dec 1863: muster roll.
4. Jan-Feb 1864: muster roll.
5. 1 Aug 1863: appears on list of names of the Engineer Corps, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

History of Company G, 3 Regimental Engineer Corps
Aug 1863-Feb 1864

This company was organized in obedience to General Order no. 66, A&IG Office, Richmond, Virginia, 22 May 1863. The enlisted men were transferred from the Infantry Regt's of Mississippi General Withers, now Major General Hurdman's Division, Army of Tennessee, in obedience to Special Order No. 205, dated Hd. Qr. Army of Tennessee, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2 Aug 1863. This company was organized 1 Aug 1863 by order of Lt. Gen. Polk, Comdg. Corps Special Order No. 205 dated 2 Aug 1863. Army of Tennessee, Chattanooga, Tennessee 2 Aug 1863 was made to embrace transfers of the various divisions of the Army organizing a battalion of Engineer Troops. This company has performed the duties of Engineer Troops from the date of organization to the present time.

Record of Events: Nov-Dec 1863

31 Oct to 20 Nov: Engaged in constructing a bridge over Chattanooga Creek. The bridge was 1000 feet long and had two clear spans 57 feet each, average height of trestles 15 feet. "Not a foot of sawed lumber in the bridge when completed."

20 Nov to 24 Nov: By order of Brig. Gen. Leadbetter, Chief Engineer of Tennessee, was constructing on Lookout Mountain, Mississippi batteries. Were driven from out batteries while at work on the morning of 24 Nov by the enemy sharpshooters. Reported to Maj. Gen. Cheatham, by whose orders preparations were made to destroy the bridge over Chattanooga Creek on the roads leading to Chickamunga Station, which were destroyed after the retreat of our forces on the morning of 25. Marched to Chickamunga Station, 6 miles.

24 Nov-31 Dec: Left Chickamunga Station by rail on the morning of 26 Nov. Assisted in destroying bridges from Chickamunga Station, Tennessee, to Ringold, Georgia. Arrived at Reasaca, Georgia, on the 27th of Nov. Assisted in building a bridge over the Oostinola River at this point. Returned to Dalton, Georgia, on 8 Dec. Floored the railroad trestle at the first crossing of Mill Creek, North of Dalton 3 miles. Constructed a bridge 103 feet long, 8 feet high, over the 3rd crossing of the Mill Creek on the Dalton, Tennessee Hill Road. Returned by rail to Reasaca, Georgia on 17 Dec. From that date to date of muster engaged in flooring railroad trestle at this point.

Record of Events: Jan-Feb 1864

Finished flooring the bridge and trestle on Western and Atlanta railroad at Reasaca, Georgia. Left Reasaca Georgia (company by rail, wagons by dirt road) on 30 Jan 1864. Arrived at Atlanta on the evening of the same day; Macons on 2nd. Since that time employed constructing pontoons for Army of Tennessee.

Following second-person account passed on by Nell Lewis:

"Andrew Jackson Adair took his wife, Frances Ann Gannt, and two children, Laura and Cordelia, with him to Rutherford, TN in 1862. They were to stay with some of the family of William Gannt while he served in the army." She went on to say:

During the war, Grandfather Adair was a wheelright in Company I of the 34th Regimental Mississippi Infantry at Tyro, Mississippi. On June 27, 1862, Private Adair was sent to a hospital in Columbus, Mississippi. His muster roll for November and December, 1862 notes that he was "still in the hospital" at Chattanooga, Tennessee. In April, 1863 his enlistment was commuted and on August 2, 1863 he was transferred to Company G of the 3rd Confederate Engineer Troops, as an Artificer. He remained in the Engineer Corps until the end of the war, and was mustered out after the surrender of Joseph E. Johnston to W. T. Sherman at Catawaba Bridge, South Carolina on May 5, 1865.

When the war was over, Grandfather was in southern Virginia. He began walking, returning to his family in Gibson County TN. On his way he encountered an old horse running at large and in a poor physical state. He captured the old animal and rode bareback until the horse died of prostration due to years of neglect.

Everyone living today whose grandfather served in the Army of the Confederacy knows the story of the Reconstruction period and of the poverty and hardships encountered by all in the Old South. Grandfather Adair continued to live in Mississippi for twenty years following the war, during which time six children had been added to the family. Grandmother Frances Gantt Adair died November 7, 1882 and was buried at Tyro, Tate County, Mississippi.

Grandfather Adair came to Texas in 1886 and settled in the Goforth community of Hays Co.. His chosen trade was carpentry and cabinet making but he also engaged in farming.

His oldest daughter, Laura, had married W.I. Hargis, a Baptist minister. She remained in Mississippi. Cordelia had married C.M. Harris, and they came to Texas with their two children. The other members of the family were J.W. ‘Jim,’ E.L. ‘Edd,’ Pearl, Coral, Arthur, and Lula.

Jim, Edd and a friend, Jim Bently, went on an expedition to the Indian Territory where they prospected for some eighteen months. While there, they witnessed the "Big Run" for land on April 22, 1889.

[Nell's NOTE: I remember Grand Dad talking about this trip when I was a child, but I didn't realize that the group prospected or stayed in OK for 18 mo., however Aunt Opal wrote this while her parents were still alive so this must have been the full story.]

Ed and Jim came from Mississippi citing harrowing experiences as they crossed through some 'wild country' of what was then known as "The Indian Territory".
Notes for Andrew Jackson Adair
James & Shirley Webb visited his grave at the Kyle Cemetery on February 24, 1995.329 The grave has a CSA veterans marker. Andrew Jackson Adair was in Company I of the 34th Mississippi Infantry and served in the Confederate Army as a wheelwright, working mostly in the maintenance of wagons. He was awarded a medal for valor sometime during the war. His civilian occupations were carpenter, cabinet maker and farmer. He was said to be a stern but fair man in his dealings with both those in and out of the family. He moved from Mississippi to Texas in 1886, following other members of the family. In his declining years, Adair lived with the family of his son, James William Adair, near the Goforth community in Hays County. He worked in the farm shop and did most of the gardening for the family. He spent quite a bit of time traveling around in his buggy visiting friends and relatives.
Notes for Andrew Jackson Adair
Following from Nell Lewis:

My Aunt Opal Adair Harvey said this in one of the articles she wrote about the Adair family:

"Andrew Jackson Adair took his wife, Frances Ann Gannt, and two children, Laura and Cordelia, with him to Rutherford, TN in 1862. They were to stay with some of the family of William Gannt while he served in the army." She went on to say:

During the war, Grandfather Adair was a wheelright in Company I of the 34th Regimental Mississippi Infantry at Tyro, Mississippi. On June 27, 1862, Private Adair was sent to a hospital in Columbus, Mississippi. His muster roll for November and December, 1862 notes that he was "still in the hospital" at Chattanooga, Tennessee. In April, 1863 his enlistment was commuted and on August 2, 1863 he was transferred to Company G of the 3rd Confederate Engineer Troops, as an Artificer. He remained in the Engineer Corps until the end of the war, and was mustered out after the surrender of Joseph E. Johnston to W. T. Sherman at Catawaba Bridge, South Carolina on May 5, 1865.

When the war was over, Grandfather was in southern Virginia. He began walking, returning to his family in Gibson County TN. On his way he encountered an old horse running at large and in a poor physical state. He captured the old animal and rode bareback until the horse died of prostration due to years of neglect.

Everyone living today whose grandfather served in the Army of the Confederacy knows the story of the Reconstruction period and of the poverty and hardships encountered by all in the Old South. Grandfather Adair continued to live in Mississippi for twenty years following the war, during which time six children had been added to the family. Grandmother Frances Gantt Adair died November 7, 1882 and was buried at Tyro, Tate County, Mississippi.

Grandfather Adair came to Texas in 1886 and settled in the Goforth community of Hays Co.. His chosen trade was carpentry and cabinet making but he also engaged in farming.

His oldest daughter, Laura, had married W.I. Hargis, a Baptist minister. She remained in Mississippi. Cordelia had married C.M. Harris, and they came to Texas with their two children. The other members of the family were J.W. Ĺ’Jim', E.L. "Edd.' Pearl, Coral, Arthur, and Lula.

Jim, Edd and a friend, Jim Bently, went on an expedition to the Indian Territory where they prospected for some eighteen months. While there, they witnessed the "Big Run" for land on April 22, 1889.

[Nell's NOTE: I remember Grand Dad talking about this trip when I was a child, but I didn't realize that the group prospected or stayed in OK for 18 mo., however Aunt Opal wrote this while her parents were still alive so this must have been the full story.]

Ed and Jim came from Mississippi citing harrowing experiences as they crossed through some 'wild country' of what was then known as "The Indian Territory".
Notes for Frances Ann (Spouse 1)
Following from the Gant book:326

Frances Ann GANT - Born on 28 Oct 1839 in Gibson Co., TN. Frances A. died in Tate Co., MS on 7 Nov 1882, she was 43. Buried in Tyro Cemetery, Tate Co., MS. On 1 Oct 1857 when Frances A. was 17, she married Andrew Jackson ADAIR, in Marshall Co., MS. Born on 13 May 1831 in Henry Co., GA. Andrew Jackson died in Kyle, Hays Co., TX on 18 Jul 1911, he was 80. Military: Wheelwright, CSA, Civil War. Occupation: carpenter and cabinetmaker. Buried in Kyle Cemetery, Kyle, Hays Co., TX. They had the following children:

<1> Laura Adeline ADAIR (1858-1948)
<2> Cordelia Paralee ADAIR (1861-1944)
<3> James William ADAIR (1866-1923)
<4> Edward Lee ADAIR (1868-)
<5> Margaret Pearl ADAIR (1871-1951)
<6> Mary Coral ADAIR (1874-1950)
<7> Arthur Iverson ADAIR (1877-1892)
<8> Lula Judsons ADAIR (1882-1959)
Last Modified 3 Sep 2020Created 21 Aug 2021 using Reunion for Macintosh
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